UNDERSTANDING COLLAPSE: THE MARGINAL PRODUCTIVITY OF SOCIOPOLITICAL CHANGE

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The central thesis of the book is that societies collapse because, as they try to solve their problems by investing more and more in complex socio-political organisation, the additional benefits arising in this process are less and less, while the costs go up and up.

the marginal productivity of investing in complexity declines and at some. C4 Understanding collapse: the marginal productivity of sociopolitical change All living systems (including human societies and political organizations) are maintained by a continuous flow of energy.

The more complex a system is, the more energy is required. 4 ("Understanding Collapse: The Marginal Productiv-ity of Sociopolitical Change"). Three cases of collapse are analyzed in detail, the Western Roman Empire, the Classic Maya, and the Chacoan (Chapter 5, "Evalua-tion: Complexity and Marginal Returns in Collapsing Societies").

Chapter 6 summarizes his findings and. Acknowledgements; 1. Introduction to collapse; 2. The nature of complex societies; 3. The study of collapse; 4. Understanding collapse: the marginal productivity of sociopolitical change; 5.

Evaluation: complexity and marginal returns in collapsing societies; 6. Summary and implications; References; Index. show more/5(). Tainter’s new theory is at the heart of the book. To develop a general explanation Tainter draws on a concept from economics, that of ‘marginal productivity’ or ‘marginal return on investment’.

Marginal cost, or marginal investment, means an increase expenditure or investment beyond the current by: The Collapse of Complex Societies, though written by an archaeologist, will therefore strike a chord throughout the social sciences. Any explanation of societal collapse carries lessons not just for the study of ancient societies, but for the members of all such societies in both the present and future.

Some mighty and prosperous empires of the past collapsed. Explanations why successful civilizations collapsed disagree even about what collapse means. In fields like Physics, Engineering and Biomathematics, collapse is a response of a system in unstable equilibrium to a perturbation.

This work applies the mathematical formulation of classical stability theory to study socio-economic collapse. 4 Understanding collapse: the marginal productivity of sociopolitical change The marginal productivity of increasing complexity Agriculture and resource production 94.

Complicity: An International Journal of Complexity and Education Volume 5 (), Number 1 • pp. ‐ • Extended Book Review A review of The Collapse of Complex Societies, by Joseph A. Tainter, Cambridge, UK. Scholars of collapse tend to fall into two loose camps. The first, dominated by Tainter, looks for grand narratives and one-size-fits-all explanations.

The second is more interested in the. 3 - The study of collapse: 4 - Understanding collapse: the marginal productivity of sociopolitical change: 5 -Evaluation: complexity and marginal returns in collapsing societies: 6. Political disintegration is a persistent feature of world history.

The Collapse of Complex Societies, though written by an archaeologist, will therefore strike a chord throughout the social sciences.

Any explanation of societal collapse carries lessons not just for the study of ancient societies, but for the members of all such societies in both the present and future.3/5(5). Any explanation of political collapse carries lessons not just for the study of ancient societies, but for the members of all complex societies in both the present and future.

Dr Tainter describes nearly two dozen cases of collapse and reviews more than years of explanations. He then develops a new and far-reaching theory that accounts for collapse among diverse kinds of societies.

[T] Chapter 4: Understanding Collapse: The Marginal Productivity of Sociopolitical Change. Part II Actors, Processes & Institutions: 5: Critical Drivers-Social Mechanisms & Cognitive Factors: Required [E] Chapter Governments Can Kill Growth.

[E] Chapter Corruption and Growth. From the Euphrates Valley to the southern Peruvian Andes, early complex societies have risen and fallen, but in some cases they have also been reborn.

Prior archaeological investigation of these societies has focused primarily on emergence and collapse. This is the first book-length work to examine the question of how and why early complex urban societies have reappeared after periods of.

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the product of diminishing returns and rising costs of increases in socio political complexity. This is the more unfortunate as Diamond's five-point framework and Tainter's theory may readily be integrated into a broader perspective on societal collapse. Increasing levels of sociopolitical complexity, the focus of Tainter's theory, drive.

Finally in his conclusion he returns to his point about understanding collapse using the lens of the marginal productivity of increasing complexity and eventual diminishing marginal returns to explain collapsed societies.

Summary of the Excerpt. In chapter 1 Tainter explains why we find collapse so fascinating and what collapse is. Ecological degradation and excessive resource consumption; collapse caused by climate change or other impact on productivity 4, 34, Complexity threshold: Complexity creates problems that only more complexity can solve; diminishing marginal returns mean burden becomes too great for society to support, and collapse occ Elite capture.

Introduction to collapse --The nature of complex societies --The study of collapse --Understanding collapse: the marginal productivity of sociopolitical change --Evaluation: complexity and marginal returns in collapsing societies --Summary and implications. Series Title: New studies in archaeology.

Responsibility: Joseph A. Tainter. More. Since the “collapse” book came out, I have been working on this topic with a couple of colleagues, Jose Lobo at Arizona State University, and Deborah Strumsky at University of North Carolina.

We looked at the productivity of innovation in the United States patent system. In the U.S. patent system, about half the patents come from overseas. From the Euphrates Valley to the southern Peruvian Andes, early complex societies have risen and fallen, but in some cases they have also been reborn.

Prior archaeological investigation of these societies has focused primarily on emergence and collapse. This is the first book-length work to examine the question of how and why early complex urban societies have reappeared after periods of.

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Introduction to collapse --The nature of complex societies --The study of collapse --Understanding collapse: the marginal productivity of sociopolitical change --Evaluation: complexity and marginal returns in collapsing societies --Summary and implications.

Series Title: New studies in archaeology. Responsibility: Joseph A. Tainter.

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Tainter’s new theory is at the heart of the book. To develop a general explanation Tainter draws on a concept from economics, that of ‘marginal productivity’ or ‘marginal return on investment’. Marginal cost, or marginal investment, means an increase expenditure or investment beyond the current s: Understanding collapse: the marginal productivity of sociopolitical change; 5.

Evaluation: complexity and marginal returns in collapsing societies; 6. Summary and implications; References; Index. Editorial Reviews "While the theoretical part of the book is quite remarkable and based on exceptional erudition, I also found the accumulation of the Price: $ The Marginal Syllabus: Educator Learning and Web Annotation Across Sociopolitical Texts and Contexts: /ch This case study examines educator learning as mediated by open web annotation among sociopolitical texts and contexts.

The chapter introduces annotation. Change (UNFCCC) secretariat has produced this book to highlight the concerns and needs of developing countries in adapting to the effects of climate change. This book outlines the impact of climate change in four developing country regions: Africa, Asia, Latin America and small island developing States; the vulnerability of these regions.

Collapse = A society can be said to collapse when it undergoes a rapid and substantial loss of an established level of socio-political complexity. This, according to Tainter, is always a political process.

The Declining Marginal Returns Theory This is a theme taken up by Guy Middleton in his book Understanding Collapse which.

First off, this is more like a long academic paper than a book. Tainter has a thesis whereby he attempts to explain the collapse of all complex societies (quite a tall order of business) and goes about this by establishing a lot of background information and existing theory review in the first part of the book.

The book is built off of a phenomenal literature review on all of history's theories of collapse, spanning a dozen different themes, and philosphers from Plato to Toynbee. Tainter offers a critique of each of the major themes of collapse, highlighting their strengths and.

Almost any event can trigger political change. An unexpected resignation, a terrorist act, or a currency collapse can completely transform the political and economic landscape. Politics and economics are forever entwined, as was dramatically demonstrated with the collapse of the Thai Baht in.

Once established, a civilization’s capacities for change become limited. Collapse results from sociopolitical ossification, bureaucratic inefficiency, or inability to deal with internal or external problems. Civilizations expire by loss of flexibility, and. that flexibility is .marginal productivity of abatement expenditures The marginal rate of transformation (MRT) of abatement costs into improved environment.

It is the slope of the feasible frontier. See also: marginal rate of transformation, feasible frontier. marginal propensity to consume (MPC) The change in consumption when disposable income changes by one unit.In economics, diminishing returns is the decrease in the marginal (incremental) output a production process as the amount of a single factor of production is incrementally increased, while the amounts of all other factors of production stay constant.

The law of diminishing returns states that in productive processes, increasing a factor of production by one, while holding all others constant.